Godot 3.0 First Impressions

Last night I tried out Godot 3.0 for the first time.

I had been using Godot 2.1.4 for quite some time. And I was really excited to learn all about the new tech. When I saw the post that Godot 3.0 was launched I couldn’t believe it! Godot had finally come! I thought it would never come!

Godot 3.0

Godot 3.0

The one thing that I am very grateful for is that the developers said a long time ago that this update would break code.

When I was learning how to use Unity, they had made some very big changes when changing versions and It just broke all of my code. As a learner this was very frustrating. The code in tutorials broke and I had to look elsewhere to learn what to do.

With Godot, this is different. Everything is very intuitive to use. I can easily do what I need to do and figure out things with the built-in documentation. For a complete beginner to programming, Godot still has a good learning curve, but it is not as steep as Unity.

And that’s why I ditched Unity. My code kept on breaking, and I couldn’t keep up with all of the fancy changes. Also, making 2D games was just clunky at the time. I would go back to Unity if I needed to. But right now Godot has everything I need.

So let’s talk about my first Impressions of Godot 3.0 as an avid user of Godot 2.1.4.

The first change that makes a difference in they way I work is the use of properties and Methods. In Godot 2.1.4 I could easily sling variables around and call functions from anywhere. This gave me great freedom as a programmer. But this freedom makes it easy to write messy code.

Objects should have a purpose. And some methods should be handled privately within the object. In Godot 3.0 I can’t just set an object’s position from another object anymore. The object itself must handle setting it’s own position. I can however give it coordinates from an outside object.

Another big change is the debugger. I can’t seem to find the remote inspector. Maybe they dropped it in this version.

Oh! I found it! You have to go to Debug at the top and click on Deploy with Remote Debug. This will give you access to the remote inspector very easily. Nice!

Remote Debug in Godot 3.0

How to enable the remote inspector in Godot 3.0

Well, I guess they moved things around. That was expected. The new UI is fresh and slick, but it comes with the cost of re-learning where everything goes.

I do wish that the properties in the Inspector were all expanded by default. I don’t like making extra clicks to access my properties in the inspector. Perhaps there is a way to set this by default.

But there is an easy one click solution for each new scene or node that you make. I wish I could set this to the default, though.

Expand All Properties

How to expand the properties in Godot 3.0

 

The types of Nodes has changed a bit and the methods for them have also changed. This is the biggest thing I have to get used to. Many things cross over from Godot 2.1.4, but the updates will take some time to re-learn. All of these changes are for the better.

The only thing that I got myself scratching my head on is what the import tab does exactly. Perhaps if I import some sounds or something it will be more useful.

Oh! I see If I click on assets in my file system, I can reimport them into the system with different settings. For instance, this Image.

What the Import Tab does in Godot 3.0

What the Import Tab does in Godot 3.0

There is still a lot of fiddling around and learning how things work in the new Godot 3.0. I’m happy to be using it to make some games. It’s the best system that I know to make games quickly and thoroughly.

Perhaps after I learn quite a bit more, I can write up some documentation. But for now, here’s my humble little blog post.

Thanks for reading! If you have any questions about the Godot game engine, leave me a comment below! I’ll try to answer as much as I can. This is still very new to me and many other people out there who wanted to wait till the stable version was released.

-Zach

Making a Casual Halloween Game – A Case Study – Part 2

Okay! I finished the game!

It’s called Spooky Pumpkin Pinball Mania!

At first it was slow going and I couldn’t get the game to feel right. I made up simple objects to get the ball rolling. Then I felt it was a little boring. Video pinball and real mechanical pinball are two entirely different animals. I had to search for a more interesting kind of game.

So I built some ghosts and houses to hit. I made the animations very simple, yet fun!

Ghost

G H O S T

ghost house

ghost house

 

Then I built the school and set up the win and lose case. If the school gets destroyed, you lose the game.

School sprite sheet

The school sprite sheet

The hardest part was making the caudron. It wasn’t hard as much as it was complicated. I had to make a whole bunch of things to get it to feel right. At first it wasn’t even moving at all. Then I had some trouble getting the meter to work properly.

Caudron

Cauldron

After that I polished up a few things such as the menus and the scoring system. I made the win and lose screens last.

And now we have a finished product!

spooky pumpkin pinball mania

spooky pumpkin pinball mania game screenshot

If you ‘d like to play the finished product for free go here!

Please rate my game if you liked it! And if you didn’t like it go ahead and let me know what I can do better next time!

I did end up making the deadline, but it was very close. I launched the Mac OS version on October 30th and then the Windows version on the 31st. I had a linux version posted to the site on the 31st, but it was the wrong game. So I posted that a few days later.

Anyways, Enjoy!

Making a Casual Halloween Game – A Case Study – Part 1

Halloween is coming on fast! Time to stitch together some candy and conjure up some costumes!

I’ve always wanted to write a holiday themed game for people to download and casually play for the kicks. And now that I have a few small games under my belt, I’m going to try my hand at this one.

It is October 5th. Can I make a game in time for Halloween with my crazy schedule? Let’s find out.

First some initial sketches of how I want to game to feel and look.

Case Study - Casual Halloween Game development

And now It’s time for bed. I know I want to build some sort of casual cutesy pinball game with a pumpkin theme.

May Game Dev 013: Download and Play

Get the game here.

Rag Doll Fight 1

You can download it for Mac OSX, Linux, and Windows.

I love how easy it is to build for other platforms in Unity!

I got rid of the control screen and figured out how to just use the Unity Input Manager. So now when you start the game, you can set up the inputs however you like. I would like a custom in-game input manager, but that’s for another game and another time.

Enjoy! Tell me what you think! Remember, this is a game that I threw together in a month. Don’t expect anything epic or unbreakable. 🙂

May Game Dev 011: Nearly there but gotta work out the kinks.

I’ve worked on it quite a bit, but I’m at a place where I think I should leave it.

I really don’t like the way the animations play out. Next time if I’m doing a fighting game, I’ll have to draw out all of the animations with sprites. I can see why it’s been done this way more often. Obviously 3d is a different story, but still the animation can’t be done with bones alone and look nice.

Tomorrow’s the last day. I’ll fix up a few bugs here and there and then post it. Not bad for a month’s work for a fighting game. It’s really a lot to think about in terms of hitboxes and interactions. Not as simple as you might think.

I think I’ll call it “Rag Doll Fight 1”

 

May Game Dev 010: The Start of a Game Controller

I’ve been working a little bit to get a main game controller and the text up and running to the game with a countdown timer.

So far so good!

Again, learning more about unity, and how easy it is to talk to each component and set things nicely. It feels like writing a web page… except better.